Don't Drink the Tea. Think With the WE.
Jun
2011
21

“There is nobody on strike in the United States today.”


Where are we today? We have seemingly added jobs, but it is not because hiring has increased. In February 2009 there were 4.7 million separations—that is, jobs lost—but by March 2011 this had fallen to 3.8 million. In other words, the pace of layoffs has diminished, but that is not the same thing as more hiring. The employment numbers look better than they really are because of the aggressive layoffs in the early part of this recession and the reluctance of American business to rehire workers. In fact, the apparent improvement in job numbers has been made up of one part extra hiring and two parts reduced firing.

A new US News article compares past recessions to the current situation in which the U.S. is mired, concluding that “The Great Recession has now earned the dubious right of being compared to the Great Depression” and that job loss figures are not, in fact, 7.5 million, but are “closer to 10.5 million, as 3 million people have stopped looking for work.”

The entire piece is a well-written Prozak prescription, a depressing and sobering take on the facts and figures we face in the form of daily hardship. Still, sobriety is necessary (once in a while). Here are some excerpts:

On sobriety…

Today, over 14 million people are unemployed. We now have more idle men and women than at any time since the Great Depression. Nearly seven people in the labor pool compete for every job opening. Hiring announcements have plunged to 10,248 in May, down from 59,648 in April. Hiring is now 17 percent lower than the lowest level in the 2001-02 downturn. One fifth of all men of prime working age are not getting up and going to work. Equally disturbing is that the number of people unemployed for six months or longer grew 361,000 to 6.2 million, increasing their share of the unemployed to 45.1 percent. We face the specter that long-term unemployment is becoming structural and not just cyclical, raising the risk that the jobless will lose their skills and become permanently unemployable.

Don’t pay too much attention to the headline unemployment rate of 9.1 percent. It is scary enough, but it is a gloss on the reality. These numbers do not include the millions who have stopped looking for a job or who are working part time but would work full time if a position were available. And they count only those people who have actively applied for a job within the last four weeks.

On the labor movement…

The inescapable bottom line is an unprecedented slack in the U.S. labor market. Labor’s share of national income has fallen to the lowest level in modern history, down to 57.5 percent in the first quarter as compared to 59.8 percent when the so-called recovery began. This reflects not only the 7 million fewer workers but the fact that wages for part-time workers now average $19,000—less than half the median income.

Just to illustrate how insecure the labor movement is, there is nobody on strike in the United States today, according to David Rosenberg of wealth management firm Gluskin Sheff. Back in the 1970s, it was common in any given month to see as many as 30,000 workers on the picket line, and there were typically 300 work stoppages at any given time. Last year there were a grand total of 11. There are other indirect consequences. The number of people who have applied for permanent disability benefits has soared. Ten years ago, 5 million people were collecting federal disability payments; now 8 million are on the rolls, at a cost to taxpayers of approximately $120 billion a year. The states today owe the federal insurance fund an astonishing $90 billion to cover unemployment benefits.

On the fragile recovery…

We are nowhere near the old normal. Throughout this fragile recovery, over 90 percent of the growth in output has come from productivity gains. But typically at this stage of the cycle, labor has already taken over from productivity as the major contributor of growth. That is why we generally saw nonfarm payroll gains exceeding 300,000 per month with relative ease. This time we have recouped only 17 percent of the job losses 23 months after the recession began, as compared to 207 percent of the jobs lost from previous recessions (with the exception of 2001). There is no comfort either in two leading indicators of employment, with no growth in the workweek or in factory overtime.

Read the whole piece HERE.

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2 Comments on ““There is nobody on strike in the United States today.””

  1. [...] intensive purposes, died. There was an average of 300 strikes at any time in America in the 1970s, however last year there was only 11 all year, and currently there are basically no strikes. In the UK, 55% of employees believe their managers [...]

  2. [...] Still, in 2010, a total of 11 strikes were documented; this compared to as many as 300 at any given time in the 1970s, according to Mortimer B. Zuckerman. [...]

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The comment’s server IP (72.233.69.24) doesn’t match the comment’s URL host IP (72.233.69.6) and so is spam.

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